Referencing and understanding plagiarism module

Referencing and understanding plagiarism covers the importance of referencing, why it is used in academic work and helps build a deep understanding of what plagiarism is and how to avoid it.

Sample activity: Considerations when quoting sources to avoid plagiarism

Green bloodshot eye

... with how many things are we upon the brink of becoming acquainted, if cowardice or carelessness did not restrain our inquiries.

(Shelley, 1818, p. 82)

Line drawing of two facings

how many things are we upon the brink of becoming acquainted, if cowardice or carelessness did not restrain our inquiries

Considerations when quoting sources to avoid plagiarism

Identify strategies for quoting sources without plagiarising

Here are 4 things to keep in mind when you use a quotation. Drag and drop the word to best fit the description.

Use quotations sparingly.

You do not gain many marks alone by reproducing the original words of others. Tutors look for evidence of your own reflections and understanding. It's up to you to interpret ideas and add to the academic discussion.

Think about whether the words you have selected are worth quoting:

  • Is it worth your investment of time and effort in analysis?
  • Does it add value and give your readers extra insight?

If they are, be brief – quote just a few words or at most a few lines.

Reference list

Shelley, M. (1818) Frankenstein; or The Modern Prometheus. London: Lackington, Hughes, Harding, Mavor and Jones of Finsbury Square.

Module content

Referencing and understanding plagiarism features the following:

  • Diagnostic test
  • Section 1: Referencing
  • Section 2: Understanding plagiarism
  • Module assessment

See what’s in each section below:

  • The difference between citations and full references
  • Why are citations are needed
  • Guidelines for writing reference and essentials to include
  • Ways of including citations in your writing
  • Points of learning from other students
  • Frequently asked questions and self-assessment
  • What is plagiarism? and how to avoid it
  • Ways of using other writers' texts without plagiarising
  • Tutors' attitude to plagiarism
  • Avoiding plagiarism while working with other students

"... with how many things are we upon the brink of becoming acquainted, if cowardice or carelessness did not restrain our inquiries." (Shelley, 1818)

 

Considerations when quoting sources to avoid plagiarism

Use quotations sparingly. You cannot gain many marks by reproducing words verbatim; tutors look for evidence of your own knowledge, understanding and academic skill.

 

How do I write the quotation?
When you do use a quotation, do the following:

 

Precision

Copy the words and punctuation exactly.

 

Omission

Use an ellipsis (...) to show the position of any words you have not included.

 

Quotation

Put ‘quotation marks’ around the words you quote, or put them in a separate paragraph, indented and with space above and below.

 

Location

In the text, state exactly where the quotation comes from: your text citation should include the page number if your programme requires it. At the end, provide a full reference in your reference list.

 

Do I really need this quotation?

Think about whether the words you have selected are worth quoting:

    Is it worth your investment of time and effort in analysis?
    Does it add value and give your readers extra insight?

If they are, be brief – quote just a few words or at most a few lines.

 

Reference list

Shelley, M. (1818) Frankenstein; or The Modern Prometheus. London: Lackington, Hughes, Harding, Mavor and Jones of Finsbury Square.

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Referencing and understanding features the following:

  • Diagnostic test
  • Section 1: Referencing
  • Section 2: Understanding plagiarism
  • Module assessment

See what’s in each section below:

 

Section 1: Referencing

Citations and references
Why are citations needed?
Guidelines for writing references
What to include in a reference
Recording source details
Ways of using sources in your writing
Introducing cited sources
Writing your reference list
Matching citations to references
Learn from other students
Frequently asked questions
Skills self-assessment
Summary

 

Section 2: Understanding plagiarism

What is plagiarism?
How to avoid plagiarism
Quoting without plagiarising
Choosing how much to quote
Using or plagiarising?
Ways of using other writers' texts
Tutors' attitude to plagiarism
Avoiding plagiarism while working with other students
Collaborating or copying?
Guidelines for collaborative work
Frequently asked questions
Skills self-assessment
Summary